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Is dental insurance worth it?

Is Dental Insurance Worth It?

January 26, 2018

Yes. According to the American Dental Association, cost of dental treatments and lack of dental insurance are the main reasons adults aged 18 to 64 don’t seek needed dental care. It’s not surprising. The average out-of-pocket cost for a preventive dental visit (exam, cleaning, x-rays and fluoride) for an uninsured adult in Washington is $250-$300.1 

That’s where dental benefits coverage comes in. 

Dental “insurance” doesn’t work the same way as your auto or home owner’s insurance. A dental benefits plan is actually a prepaid service that promotes healthy habits while creating cost savings opportunities. 

Here’s how:

Dental plans make it easy to get preventive care


Many employer-sponsored and all of our individual dental plans cover Class I benefits at 100%. Class I benefits include routine exams, cleanings and x-rays. Coverage at 100% means there’s no out-of-pocket costs to you when you see a network dentist.

Dental plans help keep costs low for other dental treatments


Dental plans offer savings opportunities for other dental treatments. For example, let’s say you need a crown which is a Class III benefit. Your plan covers them at 50% and you don’t have a deductible. Your dentist is in-network and their negotiated fee for a crown is $1,000. In this case, your dental plan pays your dentist $500 and you pay your dentist $500. 

In addition to the above perks of dental plans, we also provide cost transparency to our dental plan members. Our MySmile Cost Genie℠ gives personalized out-of-pocket cost estimates based on your benefits and dentists. This information helps you schedule treatment plans with your dentist to minimize financial impact.

Our dental plans and support services are designed to make it as easy and affordable as possible for our members to get the dental care they need.

Shopping for dental coverage? We offer 5 individual plans designed to meet any smile's needs or budget.

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1Wall, T. et al. “Most Important Barriers to Dental Care are Financial, not Supply Related.” American Dental Association Health Policy Institute. Oct 2014.

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